Hollywood’s actors strike set to end after reaching tentative deal with studios

World News

SAG-AFTRA announced it has reached a tentative agreement with the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers — one that could mark the end of a historic, nearly four-month-long actors strike that coincided with a writers’ strike, sidelined tens of thousands of workers and sent numerous TV shows and movies out of production.
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SAG-AFTRA members and supporters picketed outside Netflix headquarters on Wednesday. (Photo by ROBYN BECK/AFP via Getty Images)

AFP via Getty Images

Key Takeaways
  • The union announced the tentative agreement on a three-year contract following around two weeks of renewed negotiations that included the studios’ “Last, Best & Final” offer issued over the weekend.
  • The SAG-AFTRA strike will end Thursday at 12:01 a.m., according to The Hollywood Reporter, which added the deal will go to the union’s national board on Friday for approval.
  • Board approval would mean SAG-AFTRA’s 160,000 members would then vote to ratify the agreement.
  • Specific details of the deal are expected to be released Friday, though if the union’s demands are any indicator, a wage increase will likely be included.
Big Number

More than $6.5 billion. That’s how much the actors and writers’ strikes are projected to have cost southern California’s economy, Deadline reported.

Key Background

The actors’ strike will end more than a month after the writers’ strike concluded, giving workers the ability to return to work soon as productions spin up again.

The 118-day actors’ strike was filled with broken down negotiations between the union and studios like Disney, Netflix, Amazon and Warner Bros. Discovery.

Actors and writers went on strike over several shared concerns, collectively demanding higher wages, protection of their images and performances from AI, better residuals and higher contributions to health plans, among other asks.

This is a developing story. Check back for updates.

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